The Wolf and the Kid

A Kid was perched up on the top of a house, and looking down saw a Wolf passing under him.  Immediately he began to revile and attack his enemy.  “Murderer and thief,” he cried, “what do you here near honest folks’ houses?  How dare you make an appearance where your vile deeds are known?”

“Curse away, my young friend,” said the Wolf.

“It is easy to be brave from a safe distance.”

Tough Mudder 2019

The Woodman and the Serpent

One wintry day a Woodman was tramping home from his work when he saw something black lying on the snow.  When he came closer he saw it was a Serpent to all appearance dead.  But he took it up and put it in his bosom to warm while he hurried home.  As soon as he got indoors he put the Serpent down on the hearth before the fire.  The children watched it and saw it slowly come to life again.  Then one of them stooped down to stroke it, but the Serpent raised its head and put out its fangs and was about to sting the child to death.  So the Woodman seized his axe, and with one stroke cut the Serpent in two.  “Ah,” said he,

“No gratitude from the wicked.”

15.0% of Australians aged 16 to 85 have experienced an affective disorder. This is equivalent to 2.83 million people today.

The Bald Man and the Fly

There was once a Bald Man who sat down after work on a hot summer’s day.  A Fly came up and kept buzzing about his bald pate, and stinging him from time to time.  The Man aimed a blow at his little enemy, but acks palm came on his head instead; again the Fly tormented him, but this time the Man was wiser and said:

“You will only injure yourself if you take notice of despicable enemies.”

The Fox and the Stork

At one time the Fox and the Stork were on visiting terms and seemed very good friends.  So the Fox invited the Stork to dinner, and for a joke put nothing before her but some soup in a very shallow dish.  This the Fox could easily lap up, but the Stork could only wet the end of her long bill in it, and left the meal as hungry as when she began.  “I am sorry,” said the Fox, “the soup is not to your liking.”

“Pray do not apologise,” said the Stork.  “I hope you will return this visit, and come and dine with me soon.”  So a day was appointed when the Fox should visit the Stork; but when they were seated at table all that was for their dinner was contained in a very long-necked jar with a narrow mouth, in which the Fox could not insert his snout, so all he could manage to do was to lick the outside of the jar.

“I will not apologise for the dinner,” said the Stork:

“One bad turn deserves another.”

The Fox and the Mask

A Fox had by some means got into the store-room of a theatre. Suddenly he observed a face glaring down on him and began to be very frightened; but looking more closely he found it was only a Mask such as actors use to put over their face.  “Ah,” said the Fox, “you look very fine; it is a pity you have not got any brains.”

Outside show is a poor substitute for inner worth.

The Jay and the Peacock

A Jay venturing into a yard where Peacocks used to walk, found there a number of feathers which had fallen from the Peacocks when they were moulting.  He tied them all to his tail and strutted down towards the Peacocks.  When he came near them they soon discovered the cheat, and striding up to him pecked at him and plucked away his borrowed plumes.  So the Jay could do no better than go back to the other Jays, who had watched his behaviour from a distance; but they were equally annoyed with him, and told him:

“It is not only fine feathers that make fine birds.”

The Frog and the Ox

“Oh Father,” said a little Frog to the big one sitting by the side of a pool, “I have seen such a terrible monster!  It was as big as a mountain, with horns on its head, and a long tail, and it had hoofs divided in two.”

“Tush, child, tush,” said the old Frog, “that was only Farmer White’s Ox.  It isn’t so big either; he may be a little bit taller than I, but I could easily make myself quite as broad; just you see.”  So he blew himself out, and blew himself out, and blew himself out.  “Was he as big as that?” asked he. “Oh, much bigger than that,” said the young Frog. Again the old one blew himself out, and asked the young one if the Ox was as big as that.

“Bigger, father, bigger,” was the reply.

So the Frog took a deep breath, and blew and blew and blew, and swelled and swelled and swelled.  And then he said: “I’m sure the Ox is not as big as this.  But at this moment he burst.

Self-conceit may lead to self-destruction.

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