The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse

Now you must know that a Town Mouse once upon a time went on a visit to his cousin in the country.  He was rough and ready, this cousin, but he loved his town friend and made him heartily welcome.  Beans and bacon, cheese and bread, were all he had to offer, but he offered them freely.

The Town Mouse rather turned up his long nose at this country fare, and said: “I cannot understand, Cousin, how you can put up with such poor food as this, but of course you cannot expect anything better in the country; come you with me and I will show you how to live.  When you have been in town a week you will wonder how you could ever have stood a country life.”  No sooner said than done: the two mice set off for the town and arrived at the Town Mouse’s residence late at night.

“You will want some refreshment after our long journey,” said the polite Town Mouse, and took his friend into the grand dining-room.  There they found the remains of a fine feast, and soon the two mice were eating up jellies and cakes and all that was nice.  Suddenly they heard growling and barking. “What is that?” said the Country Mouse.  “It is only the dogs of the house,” answered the other.  “Only!” said the Country Mouse. “I do not like that music at my dinner.”

Just at that moment the door flew open, in came two huge mastiffs, and the two mice had to scamper down and run off.  “Good-bye, Cousin,” said the Country Mouse, “What! going so soon?” said the other.  “Yes,” he replied;

“Better beans and bacon in peace than cakes and ale in fear.”

  The Fox and the Crow

A Fox once saw a Crow fly off with a piece of cheese in its beak and settle on a branch of a tree.  “That’s for me, as I am a Fox,” said Master Reynard, and he walked up to the foot of the tree.  “Good-day, Mistress Crow,” he cried.  “How well you are looking to-day: how glossy your feathers; how bright your eye.  I feel sure your voice must surpass that of other birds, just as your figure does; let me hear but one song from you that I may greet you as the Queen of Birds.”  The Crow lifted up her head and began to caw her best, but the moment she opened her mouth the piece of cheese fell to the ground, only to be snapped up by Master Fox.  “That will do,” said he.  “That was all I wanted.  In exchange for your cheese I will give you a piece of advice for the future.

“Do not trust flatterers.”

  The Sick Lion

A Lion had come to the end of his days and lay sick unto death at the mouth of his cave, gasping for breath.  The animals, his subjects, came round him and drew nearer as he grew more and more helpless.  When they saw him on the point of death they thought to themselves: “Now is the time to pay off old grudges.”  So the Boar came up and drove at him with his tusks; then a Bull gored him with his horns; still the Lion lay helpless before them: so the Ass, feeling quite safe from danger, came up, and turning his tail to the Lion kicked up his heels into his face.  “This is a double death,” growled the Lion.

Only cowards insult dying majesty.

  The Ass and the Lapdog

A Farmer one day came to the stables to see to his beasts of burden: among them was his favourite Ass, that was always well fed and often carried his master.  With the Farmer came his Lapdog, who danced about and licked his hand and frisked about as happy as could be.  The Farmer felt in his pocket, gave the Lapdog some dainty food, and sat down while he gave his orders to his servants.  The Lapdog jumped into his master’s lap, and lay there blinking while the Farmer stroked his ears.  The Ass, seeing this, broke loose from his halter and commenced prancing about in imitation of the Lapdog.  The Farmer could not hold his sides with laughter, so the Ass went up to him, and putting his feet upon the Farmer’s shoulder attempted to climb into his lap.  The Farmer’s servants rushed up with sticks and pitchforks and soon taught the Ass that

  Clumsy jesting is no joke.

Previous articlePhotographer
Next articleTinker
Steve
Stephen has a degree in business with a focus on management and communications and has also studied financial planning. An experienced writer he trained with an award winning journalist and also gained experience as a photojournalist at a young age. With more than 25 years working in a variety of small and large businesses he has travelled extensively throughout Australia and has a broad range of knowledge in a variety of areas. “I pride myself on my ability to think through a situation and see it from multiple angles.” Stephen is a keen observer of the human condition and of society at large.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here